Cobra AK4698C Hiace Courier Alarm

New Zealand Product Range

New Zealand Product Range

The AK4698 has now been developed to work as a Courier alarm for the Toyota Hiace. I’m simply referring to it as the AK4698C (C for Courier) as it is programmed and wired up differently from the conventional alarm.

The alarm will arm and lock the doors with the engine still running and will disable the ultrasonic sensors to prevent any false alarms due to the windows being left open.

When the engine is not running the ultrasonic sensors are turned back on.

Most of the courier drivers I’ve spoken to in the past have not read the user manual, or had the alarm demonstrated or explained to them by the dealership! The goal is to make the alarm far more simple to use.

Hiace Courier Alarm

AK4698 Courier Alarm

The alarm is programmed for silent arming/disarming when the engine is turned off. This way early mornings will not start with a loud unsociable beep to wake everyone up!

The Siren is fitted behind the dash to make it uncomfortable for any intruders, the horn of the van also sounds if the alarm is triggered. If the engine is stopped whilst the alarm is armed it is not possible to start it again until the alarm is disarmed.

Arming with engine running:

When the engine is running the siren will chirp three times when armed. The chirps are set to full volume so it can still be heard when the windows are shut. Disarming the alarm with the engine running is silent as it is assumed that the driver will be approaching the van and can see the indicators flash at this stage, plus the doors will unlock.

If the owner has any specific requirements then the alarm can be programmed to suit.

Service Plugs

I install the service plugs behind the glove box which makes it easy for the Toyota dealership or Cobra installer to access programming mode to adjust the alarm’s settings, or to code new remote controls in the future.

Alarm Service Plugs found behind the Glovebox

There are two plugs, one with a Blue wire and the other with a Green/Red wire. Swapping the plugs over allows for normal programming of the alarm and prevents the alarm from arming with the engine running. This future proofs it to make it more suitable for use if the courier features are no longer required. The standard courier mode requires the Green/Red wire to match at either side of the plug, the same goes for the blue wired plugs.

Unplugging the Blue wire plug stops the Ultrasonic sensors from automatically being disabled when the engine is running. It also stops the siren from chirping three times upon arming with the engine running.

Note: It is still possible to isolate the ultrasonic sensors by pressing the lock button on the remote a second time when arming if this wire is unplugged.

Do not leave the Green/Red wire unplugged as the van will not start!


I recommend reading the AK4698 blog post and downloading the user manual to fully understand how it works.

The Courier alarm blog post is also recommended reading. It explains the pros and cons of most other systems and what you should consider if getting one installed.

Note: Whilst developed for the Toyota Hiace the AK4698C will work with other makes and models of vehicle.

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Julian

About Julian

Owner and Installer at Obsessive Vehicle Security Limited. More details here... Please keep Comments relevant to the post and use the Contact form for enquiry's
This entry was posted in Cobra, Courier alarms, Toyota. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Cobra AK4698C Hiace Courier Alarm

  1. Sunny Patel says:

    Hey, it’s sunny here from DHL. You installed a cobra courier alarm in my 2014 Toyota Hiace ZL 4 years ago and cause I’ve changed to DHL they require the doors to lock when the alarm is turned on and for the van to turn off if the van is broken into. Currently the van will arm when the van is running but the doors do not lock. When would you be free to change the features?
    Thanks

  2. Julian Julian says:

    Hi Sunny,

    The alarm should lock the doors with the engine running. However it will not kill the engine for legal reasons as explained here:
    http://vehiclesecurity.co.nz/blog/immobilising-a-moving-vehicle-not-cool
    Give me call to sort a time out to look at it for you: 0212425276

    Cheers,
    Julian

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